what is ssh?

Secure Shell or SSH is a network protocol that allows data to be exchanged using a secure channel between two networked devices.[1] The two major versions of the protocol are referred to as SSH1 or SSH-1 and SSH2 or SSH-2. Used primarily on Linux and Unix based systems to access shell accounts,free SSH was designed as a replacement for Telnet and other insecure remote shells, which send information, notably passwords, in plaintext, rendering them susceptible to packet analysis.[2] The encryption used by SSH is intended to provide confidentiality and integrity of data over an unsecured network, such as the Internet.

SSH uses public-key cryptography to authenticate the remote computer and allow the remote computer to authenticate the user, if necessary.[1] Anyone can produce a matching pair of different keys (public and private). The public key is placed on all computers that must allow access to the owner of the matching private key (the owner keeps the private key in secret). While authentication is based on the private key, the key itself is never transferred through the network during authentication.
SSH only verifies if the same person offering the public key also owns the matching private key. Hence in all versions of SSH, it is important to verify unknown public keys before accepting them as valid. Accepting an attacker’s public key without validation would simply authorize an unauthorized attacker as a valid user.

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